We hope that this finally puts to rest the illusions people have about fingerprint biometrics. It is plain stupid to use something that you can´t change and that you leave everywhere every day as a security token … Biometrics is fundamentally a technology designed for oppression and control, not for securing everyday device access.

-

CCC | Chaos Computer Club breaks Apple TouchID

An interesting read, if a little extreme. I’m not a fan of using biometrics for real security, but unless you’re living in a spy movie or carrying around top secret information, it’s more than secure enough to lock your phone.

christmasgorilla:

From Tyler Surfboards, courtesy of Lane Wood.

christmasgorilla:

From Tyler Surfboards, courtesy of Lane Wood.

Inspecting node.js traffic with Charles and tunnel

If you’ve ever had to debug network traffic, you know the value of a good tool like Fiddler or Charles. There are some immensely useful features, like the ability to edit and replay requests, but you can also get a lot of value just from inspecting network traffic.

Charles will automagically set itself up as a proxy for browser traffic, but things can get a little trickier when you want to intercept http requests in node.js.

This is where tunnel comes in. Tunnel let’s you tunnel traffic through a proxy with a simple tunneling agent.

When you set up your http request, you’ll usually specify a host and a port:

var http = require('http');

var req = http.request({
  host: 'example.com',
  port: 80
});

With tunnel, you can specify a tunneling proxy agent like so:

var http   = require('http'),
    tunnel = require('tunnel');

var tunnelingAgent = tunnel.httpOverHttp({
  proxy: {
    host: 'localhost',
    port: 8888 // default Charles proxy port
  }
});

var req = http.request({
  host: 'example.com',
  port: 80,
  agent: tunnelingAgent
});

Viola! Load up Charles and watch the magic happen.

Tunnel has some pretty sweet ssl support as well.

[We] calibrated details ranging from color shifts, saturation, and contrast, to the shape and blend of the vignettes before handing the specifications over to Aviary, a company specializing in photo editing. They applied their expertise to build the algorithms that matched our filter specs.

-

Twitter Engineering: How our photo filters came into focus

Read about how @twitter worked with @aviary to build out their new photo filters. Mad props to both teams!

A crowded market is actually a good sign, because it means both that there’s demand and that none of the existing solutions are good enough. A startup can’t hope to enter a market that’s obviously big and yet in which they have no competitors. So any startup that succeeds is either going to be entering a market with existing competitors, but armed with some secret weapon that will get them all the users (like Google), or entering a market that looks small but which will turn out to be big (like Microsoft).

-

Paul Graham : Essay on How to Get Startup Ideas (via msg)

Definitely worth a read.

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photojojo:

With the help of finger sweat-bands and a few pallets of energy drinks, 300 developers made 70 hacks in a short 24 hours!

Which ones were the best? Read more at the link below!

1. Pics with Friends: A guessing game! Figure out what a portion of a photo from a friend actually is.
2. Sizzly: Turns photo-editing into group collaboration. Post a photo & other users will edit it or vice versa.
3. Just a Second: Turns 1 second phone videos into GIFs that you can post on Tumblr & elsewhere.

Photo Hacks to Make Your Day

That reminds me, I’ve gotta get on my own write-up…

msg:

Aviary launched a showcase app of our mobile SDK this week. It seems like developers aren’t the only ones who like the app :)
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/photo-editor-by-aviary/id527445936?mt=8&ls=1

Not too shabby eh?

msg:

Aviary launched a showcase app of our mobile SDK this week. It seems like developers aren’t the only ones who like the app :)

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/photo-editor-by-aviary/id527445936?mt=8&ls=1

Not too shabby eh?

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